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Thursday

 

 

 

 
Join us as we explore “American Mystery Writers.” As the study group name implies, all of the novels are written by American authors. None of these are “cozy” mysteries, so be prepared to engage in lively discussions of the novels and film versions (titles in parentheses) of several of the books. The novels for spring 2018 are: Behind That Curtain, Earl Derr Biggers; The Red Harvest, Dashiell Hammett (Blood Simple); The Case of the Velvet Claws, Erle Stanley Gardner; Murder My Sweet, Raymond Chandler (Murder My Sweet); Fer de Lance, Rex Stout; The Moving Target, Ross MacDonald (Harper); China Trade, S. J. Rozan; and Strangers on a Train, Patricia Highsmith (Strangers on a Train). Any edition of the books is acceptable.

230095

Location : Wieboldt Hall Location : 
  Wieboldt Hall.

Start date: 03/08/18

14 sessions.

Days of the Week : Weekly - Thu .

Weekly - Thu 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM (3/8/2018-6/7/2018)



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This study group is a continuation of the fall study group that covered the life of Ulysses S. Grant through the surrender of Lee’s army at Appomattox. The spring semester will concentrate on Grant’s presidency, with an emphasis on Reconstruction. We will review the fall semester by viewing the American Experience DVD, Ulysses S. Grant, Part 1: Warrior, covering Grant through the Civil War. This can be considered a standalone study group for anyone interested in Grant’s presidency and the period of Reconstruction. We will use two books: American Ulysses: A Life of Ulysses S. Grant, by Ronald C. White (Random House, 2017); and Splendid Failure: Postwar Reconstruction in the American South by Michael W. Fitzgerald (American Way Series: Ivan Dees Publisher, 2008). Join us to find out why Ulysses S. Grant, formerly ranked 33rd in a 2000 C-Span rating poll of historians, jumped to 22nd in the most recent 2017 poll — the greatest swing in rating of any president in that time period.

230088

Location : Wieboldt Hall Location : 
  Wieboldt Hall.

Start date: 03/08/18

14 sessions.

Days of the Week : Weekly - Thu .

Weekly - Thu 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM (3/8/2018-6/7/2018)



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Practice your photography skills while capturing historic and distinctive Chicago images. Every other week, members of the study group will go on photo shoots that reflect Chicago, reassembling after the shoot for lunch to discuss our challenges with the assignment. On alternate weeks, we will meet at Wieboldt Hall to discuss the upcoming shoot and review a specific photographic method or technique to be practiced in the field. We will also review and critique our images to help improve our composition and photography skills. We assist each other in analyzing the photo taking process. Lastly, we will discuss how some postprocessing features might enhance the photo — however, post processing is not required for this study group. A few of our photo shoots will take place in the early AM and/or late PM to “capture Chicago in its best light.” Walking 1-2 miles is not unusual during our shoots. This study group is open to all levels of photographers but a working knowledge of aperture, shutter speed and ISO is expected. Requirements: Completing weekly assignments on a specific photography method or technique; DSLR or mirrorless camera with interchangeable lenses; and manual control cameras only. No phone cameras, please. Access to Canvas, Lynda.com and You Tube are required.  

030003

Location : Wieboldt Hall Location : 
  Wieboldt Hall.

Start date: 03/08/18

14 sessions.

Days of the Week : Weekly - Thu .

Weekly - Thu 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM (3/8/2018-6/7/2018)



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“If you want to feel young, go to a chamber music concert,” wrote Joseph Epstein, essayist and short-story writer. Chamber music provides an opportunity for the listener to share the intimate, intense communication of a small group of musicians performing masterpieces by great composers. Chamber music initially was written for 2 to 4 instruments, primarily with strings and sometimes keyboard. It was commissioned by patrons and performed in elegant settings such as homes or palaces. Beginning with Mozart, composers began to write chamber works for larger ensembles of up to 8 or more instruments to be performed in concert for paying audiences. The additional instruments provided an added dimension to the musical experience. Because few chamber ensembles have the required musicians for such works, they are less frequently performed and well known. Yet, many are among the most beloved masterpieces of both chamber and the entire classical music literature. Join us as we look at some of the composers, their chamber music oeuvre, and listen to several of these works, including one considered by many to be the greatest chamber works ever written. Participants will be encouraged to do research, make presentations and/or lead discussions. Note: This study group will run during the last seven weeks of the semester. * NOTE: Participants may register for this study group alone or in combination with a second 7-week study group. Registering for up to two 7-week study groups counts as one study group choice on your membership package, but it must be done through the OLLI office. Please indicate your choice(s) on your registration form. 7-week study groups include the following: Fostering Civic Engagement through the Creative Arts II; Our Declaration; Make Powerful OLLI Presentations; Fiction Writing Workshop I or II; Strangers in Their Own Land; Chamber Music Masterpieces for Larger Ensembles.

230086

Location : Wieboldt Hall Location : 
  Wieboldt Hall.

Start date: 04/26/18

7 sessions.

Days of the Week : Weekly - Thu .

Weekly - Thu 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM (4/26/2018-6/7/2018)



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If you had the capacity to speed evolution by rewriting the genetic code of cells, would you do it? Designer plants — maybe? Supermen and women — maybe not? Biochemists have discovered a technique for editing DNA, called CRISPR. Medical researchers are using CRISPR now to cure mice with HIV and hemophilia. Geneticists are engineering pigs to make them suitable as human organ donors. Bill Gates is spending $75 million to endow a few Anopheles mosquitos, which spread malaria, with a sort of genetic time bomb that could wipe out the species. A professor at Penn State has created blemish-resistant mushrooms by knocking out a gene that causes them to turn brown when handled. A team at Harvard plans to edit 1.5 million letters of elephant DNA to resurrect the woolly mammoth. What could be better? Anyone can edit DNA with a simple hobby kit selling for $150. In this study group, we will learn about the science behind CRISPR and consider the ethical consequences of having the power to direct evolution. Our text is A Crack in Creation — Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution by Jennifer Doudna and Samuel Sternberg, (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017). Join us!

230097

Location : Wieboldt Hall Location : 
  Wieboldt Hall.

Start date: 03/08/18

14 sessions.

Days of the Week : Weekly - Thu .

Weekly - Thu 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM (3/8/2018-6/7/2018)



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Are you still trying to understand how the host of Celebrity Apprentice became our President? Are you unclear how modern American political discourse became “post-factual”? Are you wondering how the land of the free and the home of the brave became the land of “fake news” and the home of “alternative facts?” In Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire (Random House, 2017), best-selling novelist Kurt Anderson leads us on a witty, erudite, but ultimately sobering tour through 500 years of over-the-top American irrationality. Anderson proves that the inclination to prefer the fantastic to the true is as American as apple pie, and came over on the Mayflower. We meet a colorful cast of characters, from Cotton Mather and P. T. Barnum to assorted conspiracy theorists, snake oil salesmen, political hucksters and fringe religionists. Most thoughtprovoking, however, is Anderson’s analysis of modern America, starting with the counter-culture of the late 60s. The counter-culture’s assault on reason planted the seeds of the intellectual dystopia that gave us Donald Trump and many others who think the truth is what they believe because they believe it. The inmates now run the asylum, and you owe it to yourself to find out how it happened.

230085

Location : Wieboldt Hall Location : 
  Wieboldt Hall.

Start date: 03/08/18

14 sessions.

Days of the Week : Weekly - Thu .

Weekly - Thu 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM (3/8/2018-6/7/2018)



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You’ve taken so many courses focused on the literature of great writers that you’re finding yourself with a bit of a writer’s itch. Join us for a 7-week course on fiction writing led by a creative writing teaching assistant from Northwestern and meet once per week for two hours. In the first hour, we’ll review an assigned reading by a published author and discuss differing writing techniques. Following will be a group discussion and critique of class participants’ own works of fiction. (The semester will be structured so that each week, a few people submit printed copies of their short stories or book chapters to the group so that the following week, we can come together to discuss our notes on those pages.) Let the narratives of the classics guide you as you get creative and your imagination takes to the page! And while your own life probably tells a compelling story, no memoirs, please. This is a fiction class so channel those experiences into bringing characters to life. The required text for this study group is Nobody’s Fool by Richard Russo (Vintage, 1994). Note: This study group will run during the first seven weeks of the semester. * NOTE: Participants may register for this study group alone or in combination with a second 7-week study group. Registering for up to two 7-week study groups counts as one study group choice on your membership package, but it must be done through the OLLI office. Please indicate your choice(s) on your registration form. 7-week study groups include the following: Fostering Civic Engagement through the Creative Arts II; Our Declaration; Make Powerful OLLI Presentations; Fiction Writing Workshop I or II; Strangers in Their Own Land; Chamber Music Masterpieces for Larger Ensembles.

230094

Location : Wieboldt Hall Location : 
  Wieboldt Hall.

Start date: 03/08/18

7 sessions.

Days of the Week : Weekly - Thu .

Weekly - Thu 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM (3/8/2018-4/19/2018)



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You’ve taken so many courses focused on the literature of great writers that you’re finding yourself with a bit of a writer’s itch. Join us for a 7-week course on fiction writing led by a creative writing teaching assistant from Northwestern and meet once per week for two hours. In the first hour, we’ll review an assigned reading by a published author and discuss differing writing techniques. Following will be a group discussion and critique of class participants’ own works of fiction. (The semester will be structured so that each week, a few people submit printed copies of their short stories or book chapters to the group so that the following week, we can come together to discuss our notes on those pages.) Let the narratives of the classics guide you as you get creative and your imagination takes to the page! And while your own life probably tells a compelling story, no memoirs, please. This is a fiction class so channel those experiences into bringing characters to life. The required text for this study group is The Return of the Soldier by Rebecca West (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics, 1998). Note: This study group will run during the last seven weeks of the semester.  * NOTE: Participants may register for this study group alone or in combination with a second 7-week study group. Registering for up to two 7-week study groups counts as one study group choice on your membership package, but it must be done through the OLLI office. Please indicate your choice(s) on your registration form. 7-week study groups include the following: Fostering Civic Engagement through the Creative Arts II; Our Declaration; Make Powerful OLLI Presentations; Fiction Writing Workshop I or II; Strangers in Their Own Land; Chamber Music Masterpieces for Larger Ensembles.

230092

Location : Wieboldt Hall Location : 
  Wieboldt Hall.

Start date: 04/26/18

7 sessions.

Days of the Week : Weekly - Thu .

Weekly - Thu 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM (4/26/2018-6/7/2018)



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As an OLLI member or coordinator, have you ever wondered how you can increase the understanding of and add “pizazz” to your discussion with your study group? Or better yet, have an outline at your fingertips to move you effortlessly as you facilitate? By mastering just a few basic steps to create a slide presentation, you can laser-focus the attention of your audience. Discover how to easily incorporate photos, articles, video, audio and animation. Come join our 7-week study group to improve your communication skills and become a more effective presenter. Each weekly session will focus on one or two aspects of slide presentation software. Then practice at home, and prepare a short 2–4 slide presentation to the class. Requirements are: (1) PC or Apple computer (portable, desktop or iPad); or Chromebook. (2) Access to Lynda.com and Canvas. PC users need the PowerPoint program; Mac users need the PowerPoint or Keynote program. Note: This study group will run during the first seven weeks of the semester. * NOTE: Participants may register for this study group alone or in combination with a second 7-week study group. Registering for up to two 7-week study groups counts as one study group choice on your membership package, but it must be done through the OLLI office. Please indicate your choice(s) on your registration form. 7-week study groups include the following: Fostering Civic Engagement through the Creative Arts II; Our Declaration; Make Powerful OLLI Presentations; Fiction Writing Workshop I or II; Strangers in Their Own Land; Chamber Music Masterpieces for Larger Ensembles.

230096

Location : Wieboldt Hall Location : 
  Wieboldt Hall.

Start date: 03/08/18

7 sessions.

Days of the Week : Weekly - Thu .

Weekly - Thu 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM (3/8/2018-4/19/2018)



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Maps have a mysterious hold over us. Whether ancient parchments or generated by Google, maps tell us things we want to know, not only about our current location or where we are going, but about the world in general. And yet, when it comes to geopolitics, much of what we are told is generated by analysts and other experts who have neglected to refer to a map of the place in question. In this study group, we will examine maps of Russia, China, the US, Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Japan, Korea, and Greenland and the Arctic — their weather, seas, mountains, rivers, deserts, and borders — to provide a context often missing from our political reportage: how the physical characteristics of these countries affect their strengths and vulnerabilities and the decisions made by their leaders. We will glimpse a future where these characteristics may or may not play an even greater role in our lives. Our textbook is Prisoners of Geography: Ten Maps That Explain Everything About the World, by Tim Marshall, (Scribner, 2016). Familiarity with Google Earth is helpful, but not required.

230100

Location : Wieboldt Hall Location : 
  Wieboldt Hall.

Start date: 03/08/18

14 sessions.

Days of the Week : Weekly - Thu .

Weekly - Thu 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM (3/8/2018-6/7/2018)



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From a frontier outpost of 400 people in 1833 to a century later, Chicago became a thriving metropolis of 3.4 million people. Risk-taking entrepreneurs developed the infrastructure, and immigrants did the back-breaking work of building a city that became the Midwestern hub of the nation. In addition to these two essential groups, there was another category of residents: the people who built the organized crime networks. In Al Capone’s Beer Wars: A Complete History of Organized Crime in Chicago During Prohibition (Prometheus Books, 2017), John Binder, Associate Professor Emeritus at UIC, focuses on the Prohibition era, but also includes Chicago’s frontier history and its criminal gangs. The author explores the relationships between crooks, corrupt politicians, and the police. He delineates how the complexity of these associations led to the emergence of vice, gambling and corruption in Chicago that resulted in the vice wars of the Prohibition era. Please join us for what will surely be lively discussions about this fascinating era. Note: This study group meets for ten weeks, starting 03/15/18 and ending on 05/17/18.

230084

Location : Wieboldt Hall Location : 
  Wieboldt Hall.

Start date: 03/15/18

10 sessions.

Days of the Week : Weekly - Thu .

Weekly - Thu 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM (3/15/2018-5/17/2018)



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The relationship between the enduring qualities of great written works and the enlivening activity of discussing them is the cornerstone of this study group. This semester we will read the anthology Identity & Self Respect, (Great Books Foundation) which includes readings from James Baldwin, Plato, Alice Munro, Virginia Woolf, Anton Chekhov, & T.S. Eliot. In addition, we will read Emma by Jane Austen (Penguin Classics, 2015) and Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison (Second Vintage International, 1995). The anthology is available through The Great Books Foundation (312-332-5870) or www.greatbooks.org/store. Please join us for lively and thought-provoking discussions in one of OLLI’s long standing study groups.

230093

Location : Wieboldt Hall Location : 
  Wieboldt Hall.

Start date: 03/08/18

14 sessions.

Days of the Week : Weekly - Thu .

Weekly - Thu 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM (3/8/2018-6/7/2018)



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